Reading events from the blog-o-sphere give me impetus to read (or finish!) books that I probably would not have. My editions of the Narnia Chronicles were gifted to me as a child, and they are well tattered with use. But somehow I never finished The Horse And His Boy, although it is my son’s favorite. (And, the reason you see it on my kindle is so that I can read it late at night in the quiet dark.)

Published in 1954, The Horse and His Boy seemed a perfect fit for the #1954 Club hosted this week by Karen and Simon. It is a children’s book, after all, and a welcome respite after some heavy International Booker Prize longlisted books. (Books of Jacob I’m talking to you.) I almost forgot how powerful C. S. Lewis’ faith is, along with the insight he has in portraying it.

Briefly, Shasta lives with an unkind fisherman whom he calls father. When a visitor riding a war horse named Bree appears, Shasta discovers that Bree is a Talking Horse who longs for Narnia. As Shasta also longs for the North, they decide to run away together, and on the way encounter Aravis going to Narnia with her horse, Hwin.

Here I will leave you with a few of my favorite quotes from the book:

He had not yet learned that if you do one good deed your reward usually is to be set to do another and harder and better one.

and

…dismiss it all from your minds and be comforted…be of good hope.

and

But as long as you know you’re nobody special, you’ll be a very decent sort of Horse, on the whole…

and

I was quite safe. That is why the Lion kept on my left. He was between me and the edge all the time.

My dear friend Carol’s favorite quote is this, when Hwin comes quite bravely up to the Lion she says, ”You may eat me if you like. I’d sooner be eaten by you than fed by anyone else.”

Really, this book is as remarkable a treatise on faith as something written by Dietrich Bonhoeffer. (You can find a most fascinating discussion of this book on Calmgrove’s post, as he is hosting a read-along of the Chronicles of Narnia.)

And now for something completely different! Let’s talk about Traveler’s Company notebooks. I have always told myself, as Mary Poppins tells Jane and Michael, “Enough is as good as a feast.”

But, it didn’t hold true this time. While I enjoyed my regular sized Traveler’s Notebook in brown from 2016 to 2021, I have become greedy and purchased the Kyoto edition, and now the passport Traveler’s Train. I like to think that it was the invitation to take an imaginary journey, to go wherever you like, while sitting in the dining car with your notebook and your thoughts. Apparently, a feast is made up of three or more.

22 thoughts on “Sunday Salon: A Book for The #1954 Club and a new limited edition Traveler’s Notebook

  1. I love the Midori Travelers notebooks. I am compelled to spend more money as you have made me aware of the Kyoto edition.
    Thanks for all the thoughts and posts on your site. They often give me guidance on especially difficult books.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Joe, for your comment of support.

      This is not an ad, only sharing information that I found, that while the LIMITED EDITION of Traveler’s Notebook 2022 is sold out almost everywhere, except for double the price from racketeers on eBay, you can find all four at Merrymaker Paper in Virginia here. (https://merrymakerpaper.com/collections/journals-for-travel/products/limited-edition-notebook-set-travelers)

      And, I love the Kyoto edition from our visit there in 2018. Imagine my dismay when I was looking for Midori notebooks unaware that they are Traveler’s Company. I am only so helpful, you know.😛

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  2. I also appreciate the various blogging events that motivate me to read from my personal stacks. I’ve already started lining up various books for the Paris in July and 20 Books of Summer challenges.

    Lovely travel journals! How many have you filled over the years? I also love your tan Kindle! I have an ancient Nook, but still prefer my print books over ebooks. I’m certain the day will come when I make the switch, mainly for the option of enlarging the font size. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I saw that Cathy (of 746 Books) was setting up her 20 Books of Summer list on Instagram the other day…Lonesome Dove was on it, which I am dying to read again! I’d love to know what you are considering for Paris in July and 20 Books of Summer.

      My silly kindle is the cheapest one, $99.00 I think, which is white appearing tan in the dark of my desk. E-readers are not my favorite, but they are terribly convenient in terms of being light, and bright, and the font can be increased as needed. I can’t imagine how I held truly heavy books when I was younger and didn’t even notice the heft or the print size. But, you and I stand together on appreciating print the most. Where else can you smell the lovely fragrance of glue and paper, and feel the thing page being turned?☺️

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      1. I have had Lonesome Dove on my TBR list for decades… Maybe this year. I’m currently reading a 600+ page novel (The Shell Seekers) and may just devote 2022 to all chunksters. 🙂

        How odd that your white Kindle looks like a lovely tan leather in the photo!

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  3. I saw that you are reading The Shell Seekers in your sidebar. I loved that book, too! In fact, I am eager to do a massive rereading of all my most beloved books, most of which are chunksters. I’ll definitely add Shell Seekers to Lonesome Dove. Maybe they would count as four instead of two🤔?

    Let me know if you didn’t get my comments on your blog; I can never tell if they’ve stuck or not.❤️

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    1. This is the second time I’ve read The Shell Seekers. It’s been 35 years since the first time I read it and it feels like a completely new book. I’d forgotten so many details and subplots. I still love it, thank goodness.

      I did get your comments on my blog. Thanks for checking. 🙂

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  4. What a wonderful review! The think that I love about Lewis’s writing is that is faith while strongly grounded in Christianity speaks of universal human values and hold true across geographies and times. Lovely journals ….downright gorgeous!:)

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    1. C. S. Lewis certainly does span the ages, doesn’t he? I think it’s largely because he speaks of Truth, and that is never deniable. And, his stories touch our (my) heart. They never get old to me; in fact I am more richer with each rereading,

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Well, for this moment in time my travel needs to be imaginary…we spent all our vacation funds to Japan in 2018! But, I take such pleasure in buying the Traveler’s Company notebooks; do look at them online! They get the most gorgeous patina, and they can be carried anywhere. Perhaps one of the best parts is that the inserts can be filled, removed, and stored for reference, without ever needing to change the leather cover itself. As such a wonderful writer as you are, I would think you would enjoy this system immensely,

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        1. Now we enter into a whole other “problem”: what does one do with all of one’s filled notebooks? I have mine stored in cardboard boxes which once held reams of paper for school, but that isn’t very accessible! What do you do with yours? I seriously would love to know and could talk about journals forever…

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          1. Yes, that is a problem! I don’t have a great system—the more recent ones tend to hang around in stacks next to my bed or by my work desk if I’ve been transcribing them, and then at some point they tend to migrate to the inside of a cupboard, and finally, yes, good old cardboard boxes. I usually go through them and pull out things I think I may use in my writing and type them up into digital files, so I rarely have to go hunting through the boxes to find something in a long-lost notebook, but I keep them because… well, I think you know why! Do you find the insert system makes it harder or easier to store them? I guess they’d be less bulky without the covers, but also maybe more prone to damage?

            Liked by 1 person

            1. Phew! I’m almost relieved you haven’t discovered the quintessential solution, as I have been searching for one for years and have all but given up. I think the only solution for my notebooks besides tying them in ribbons, putting them in cupboards, or eventually storing them in cardboard boxes is this: a Midori binder, specifically made for the inserts I use in the leather cover. (Here is a link to my favorite store, which ships for free over $25.00, but you can find them anywhere…even Amazon: https://www.jetpens.com/TRAVELER-S-COMPANY-TRAVELER-S-notebook-Binder-011-Regular-Size/pd/13655?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIwuvh6Y7J9wIVErfICh0jrAHpEAQYASABEgLwxPD_BwE)

              Sure, if we throw money at a problem there is often a solution, but then again, what price would be too steep for writing and recording one’s life?🤭 I’m so glad you understand.

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              1. Oh, that’s very neat! You could even use the tags to see the dates or contents at a glance. Somehow I prefer the idea of tying them in ribbons, though! It reminds me of bundles of love letters, which is perhaps appropriate because I see journalling as a kind of act of self-love—it’s saying your life is important, your thoughts are important and are worth recording and keeping. The binder is of course much more practical, but is this really a practical endeavour anyway? 🙂

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  5. M, I love your TNs 🙂 I have a few, too. In fact, I just received a black one from Baum-Kuchen that I had them personalize for me – a BK Truly Yours edition. And now I am in LOVE with it. I was so excited that I put aside my current journal to use this new one. I had them emboss ALL IS WELL on the front cover and just seeing that every day makes me smile inside. I did buy one of the new limited edition TNs – the passport one with the record charm. I couldn’t resist 🙂 I’m so glad you shared about your TNs. xx

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I saw your gorgeous customized TN on Instagram; it is beautiful! Sadly, Baum-Kuchan ruined my black passport TN. After I had it stamped with Wabi Sabi, and it came back to me, the spine was a wrinkled disaster! I am happy yours turned out, and to rectify my situation, I bought the train edition you see above. We can never have enough TNs, can we?!

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  6. I think The Horse and the Boy was my least favorite of the Narnia books! But I’ve never cared much for books about animals. Talking animals, yes, but regular animals, no. So I was probably prejudiced. I’ve started planning my chunkster’s for Sue Jackson’s Big Book Summer, and I think I’m going to start with Pillars of the Earth. I’d like to read The Shell Seekers again, too!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for telling me about the Big Book summer! I am absolutely going to do that, while editing it to my own needs at the same time, as my Big Books will also be Rereads, and I can’t wait to open such chunksters again. Like Pillars or The Earth, The Shell Seekers, as you mention, and many more dear to my heart such as Anna Karenina, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicles, Atlas Shrugged, The Crimson Petal and The White, A Suitable Boy. Well, you get the idea. 😉

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